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Why fascism is so tempting— and how your data could power it - Yuval Noah Harari

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Author and historian Yuval Noah Harari explains the important difference between fascism and nationalism — and what the consolidation of our data means for the future of democracy. Harari warns that the greatest danger that now faces liberal democracy is that the revolution in information technology will make dictatorships more efficient and capable of control.

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  • Speaker Yuval Noah Harari