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The moral dangers of non-lethal weapons - Stephen Coleman

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Pepper spray and tasers are in increasing use by both police and military, and more exotic non-lethal weapons such as heat rays are in the works. In this talk, ethicist Stephen Coleman explores the unexpected consequences of their introduction and asks some challenging questions. (Filmed at TEDxCanberra.)

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Stephen Coleman studies applied ethics, particularly the ethics of military and police force, and their application to human rights. Ethics are the moral principles governing behavior. In this article, philosopher and social critic Bertrand Russell analyzes the ethics of war. The New York Times has a column devoted to ethics called "The Ethicist." Find out more about the U.S. Department of Defense Non-Lethal Weapons Program. The powerful, crucial talks in the TED playlist "War stories" come from soldiers, politicians, journalists and others who've seen the reality of war firsthand.

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