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Light waves, visible and invisible

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TEDEd Animation

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Each kind of light has a unique wavelength, but human eyes can only perceive a tiny slice of the full spectrum -- the very narrow range from red to violet. Microwaves, radio waves, x-rays and more are hiding, invisible, just beyond our perception. Here is a closer look at the waves we can’t see.

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  • Director Adam Comiskey

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