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How fast can a vaccine be made? - Dan Kwartler

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  • 15,733 Questions Answered
  • TEDEd Animation

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When a new pathogen emerges, our bodies and healthcare systems are left vulnerable. And when this pathogen causes the outbreak of a pandemic, there’s an urgent need for a vaccine to create widespread immunity with minimal loss of life. So how quickly can we develop vaccines when we need them most? Dan Kwartler describes the three phases of vaccine development.

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About TED-Ed Animations

TED-Ed Animations feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Are you an educator or animator interested in creating a TED-Ed Animation? Nominate yourself here »

Meet The Creators

  • Educator Dan Kwartler
  • Director Kunal Sen
  • Narrator Jack Cutmore-Scott
  • Storyboard Artist Kunal Sen
  • Animator Kunal Sen
  • Art Director Kunal Sen
  • Compositor Kunal Sen
  • Music Landon Trimble / Playdate
  • Sound Designer Landon Trimble / Playdate
  • Director of Production Gerta Xhelo
  • Editorial Director Alex Rosenthal
  • Producer Bethany Cutmore-Scott
  • Editorial Producer Dan Kwartler
  • Fact-Checker Eden Girma
  • Science Consultant Melvin Sanicas, Merlin Sanicas
  • Special Thanks Natalie Coleman
  • See more
Additional Resources for you to Explore
The first vaccination was created in 1798 by Edward Jenner. He began his work in 1796. Why do vaccines take so much time to create? In times of new pathogens, its critical to understand how quickly vaccines can be creed in order to minimize loss of life.

Health Affairs published an article in 2005 on the history of vaccines. Below is the Abstract from their article. After browsing through the article This History of Vaccines take some time to share your response to the Discussion Question below.

“Human beings have benefited from vaccines for more than two centuries. Yet the pathway to effective vaccines has been neither neat nor direct. This paper explores the history of vaccines and immunization, beginning with Edward Jenner’s creation of the world’s first vaccine for smallpox in the 1790s. We then demonstrate that many of the issues salient in Jenner’s era—such as the need for secure funding mechanisms, streamlined manufacturing and safety concerns, and deep-seated public fears of inoculating agents—have frequently reappeared and have often dominated vaccine policies. We suggest that historical awareness can help inform viable long-term solutions to contemporary problems with vaccine research, production, and supply.”

healthaffairs.org

To see a short video in favor of vaccination check out the CDC video on why it’s important to get a flu shot and for both the pros and cons, check out Khan Academy’s video here.


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Create and share a new lesson based on this one.

About TED-Ed Animations

TED-Ed Animations feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Are you an educator or animator interested in creating a TED-Ed Animation? Nominate yourself here »

Meet The Creators

  • Educator Dan Kwartler
  • Director Kunal Sen
  • Narrator Jack Cutmore-Scott
  • Storyboard Artist Kunal Sen
  • Animator Kunal Sen
  • Art Director Kunal Sen
  • Compositor Kunal Sen
  • Music Landon Trimble / Playdate
  • Sound Designer Landon Trimble / Playdate
  • Director of Production Gerta Xhelo
  • Editorial Director Alex Rosenthal
  • Producer Bethany Cutmore-Scott
  • Editorial Producer Dan Kwartler
  • Fact-Checker Eden Girma
  • Science Consultant Melvin Sanicas, Merlin Sanicas
  • Special Thanks Natalie Coleman
  • See more