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What if all the sea water became fresh water?

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Where do you go to quench your thirst? The kitchen sink? The local bar? The mineral-rich springs of Bergamo, Italy? In the 21st century, you don’t have to go that far for fresh water. But still, supply is running out. What if we didn’t have to worry about water consumption? What If investigates.

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