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How much sleep do you actually need?

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Tired? We all know the feeling; irritable, groggy and exceptionally lazy. Chances are you didn’t sleep enough last night… or the past few nights. But what exactly is “enough” sleep? And more importantly, can you ever “catch up” on it? AsapSCIENCE explores the science of sleep.

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