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How a case gets to the US Supreme Court

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The US Supreme Court has been designed to be reactive to legislative decisions made in other branches of government, as opposed to an active legislative body that seeks to create and institute new laws. VOX explains how a case can make its way to the Supreme Court and how the court prioritizes case selections.

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