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Should I stay or should I switch doors?

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The Monty Hall Problem is a brain teaser based on the popular game show, Let's Make a Deal. The folks at Numberphile explore the famous problem which posits if a contestant should switch doors in order to find the car amongst the goats.

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Additional Resources for you to Explore
The Monty Hall Problem has perplexed and angered people for years. Some individuals become very emotional about this problem. However there are a number of different sites explaining the solution to the Monty Hall problem. Take a look

Wikipedia's page for the Monty Hall Problem

Online simulation of the Monty Hall Problem

You might also be interested in this extended explanation and simulation that demonstrates the Monty Hall Problem with even more doors!
Avatar for Gerald Trost
Gerald Trost • Klagenfurt, Austria • LESSON IN PROGRESS
Sample: suppose you can win the first price with a probability of 1/10000 because 10000 people have played. Next day somebody of the jury tells you the winner is in another state. All of a sudden your chance has changed from 0.0001 to 0 - Zero chance because of the new additional knowledge. Similar: if you see a Zonk in your second door your chance suddenly chances to 0.5 (50%) because of the new knowledge - and this fits perfectly to reality - 2 possibilities are left. People believe that they can calculate luck in casinos because they did not make their Math homework - so why do you LET people get even more confused by such nonsense? please, before you publish something misterious, let mathematicians check it first!
01/07/2015 • 
 1 Response
 / 1 Updates
Avatar for Vitor Costa
09/19/2014 • 
 0 Responses
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Avatar for Yair Harris
The host puts the three cards in front of you, but slips up and allows you a quick glimpse at card number two, so you know it is a loser. You think to yourself, the right card is either card number one or card number three = 0.5 chance. You pick card number one. The host reveals card number two and as you already knew, it is a losing card. Now the host surprises you and offers you to switch your choice. Should you? Suddenly it is a 0.5 chance whatever you do. But you knew more at the beginning!
09/18/2014 • 
 5 Responses
 / 5 Updates
Avatar for Lilly Redding
The people explore the problem which posits if a contestant should switch doors.
08/26/2014 • 
 0 Responses
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Avatar for Remus Gogu
If you have to choose between door 1 and door 3, and behind one of them is the car, then in the new situation it feels like there is 50% chance of winning, not 2/3 if you switch. I am not sure if the debate is finally settled, but I think there should be strong arguments to hold a position on one side or the other. Maybe there is a smart re-framing of the question that could help :-).
08/24/2014 • 
 7 Responses
 / 7 Updates
Avatar for Pedro H. Salomão
If I had the chance I`ll make the switch, doesn`t matter if I win or lose, I`ll always make the switch cause statisticlly I`ll have more chance of winning.
01/14/2016 • 
 0 Responses
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Avatar for Akshay Gupta
How can we create a random outcome like we do from a dice(6 outcomes) or the filp of a coin(2 outcomes) I am looking for a shape where we can find a choice out of 4 choices
04/03/2017 • 
 2 Responses
 / 2 Updates
Avatar for Rylan Do
06/01/2022 • 
 0 Responses
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