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Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality - Anil Seth

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Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience -- your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we're all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it "reality."

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