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What if everyone jumped at once?

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If every action has an equal and opposite reaction, what kind of physical action would it take for the earth to notice us? 

Check out Vsauce's video on what would happen if everyone on Earth got together and jumped. 

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Additional references


What is Newton's third law? - Khan Academy

You probably know that the Earth pulls down on you. What you might not realize is that you are also pulling up on the Earth. For example, if the Earth is pulling down on you with a gravitational force of 500 N, you are also pulling up on the Earth with a gravitational force of 500 N. This remarkable fact is a consequence of Newton's third law.

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Vsauce provided some excellent supplemental information for this lesson: 
Japan Earthquake and Earth's rotation
All people in one place LIVING shoulder-to-shoulder
BBC Jump Video
SCALE OF UNIVERSE AWESOME
STRAIGHTDOPE article on a jump
Dot Physics on the jump
Interactive scale of the universe
Decimate
Dunbar's Number
NPR story on Dunbar's number
Life Expectency
How many people you meet in your life
Newton's Third Law
Why videos views freeze in the 300s on YouTube

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