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Why don’t woodpeckers get concussions?

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Wood is tough stuff, which is why we use it to hold up houses. If you’ve ever swung an axe against a tree, you know that chipping away wood takes a lot of force. Now imagine chipping away that wood… with your face. That’s what it’s like to be a woodpecker. It’s Okay To Be Smart investigates the hard headed nature of woodpeckers.

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