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Why are we the only humans left?

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Just 50,000-100,000 years ago, Earth was home to three or four separate human species, including our most famous cousins: the Neanderthals. New research has shown that Neanderthals were not the brutish, unintelligent cavemen that cartoons make them out to be. So why did they go extinct as soon as Homo sapiens moved into their territory? It’s Okay To Be Smart investigates.

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