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Biljana Labovic

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Celeste Lai

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James Sheils

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Additional Resources for you to Explore

Here's a journal artical about Physics Education. In it, you can read more details about the historical origins of electrical vocabulary: http://iopscience.iop.org/0031-9120/47/1/78/article

http://iopscience.iop.org/0031-9120/47/1/78/pdf/0031-9120_47_1_78.pdf

Benjamin Franklin's kite experiment is one of the foundational scientific explorations dealing with electricity. http://www.ushistory.org/franklin/info/kite.htm

http://fi.edu/franklin/scientst/electric.html

Jean-Antoine Nollet popularized science in France. His most famous illustration was an electric shock that passed through 180 of King Louis XV's Royal Guards. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/417286/Abbe-Jean-Antoine-Nollet

Thales of Miletos made a series of observations on static electricity around 600 BC, from which he believed that friction rendered amber magnetic, in contrast to minerals such as magnetite, which needed no rubbing. Thales was incorrect in believing the attraction was due to a magnetic effect, but later science would prove a link between magnetism and electricity. http://www.iep.utm.edu/thales/

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