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What is Alzheimer's disease? - Ivan Seah Yu Jun

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Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting over 40 million people worldwide. And though it was discovered over a century ago, scientists are still grappling for a cure. Ivan Seah Yu Jun describes how Alzheimer's affects the brain, shedding light on the different stages of this complicated, destructive disease.

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TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Are you an educator or animator interested in creating a TED-Ed original? Nominate yourself here »

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  • Educator Ivan Seah Yu Jun
  • Animator Chris Boyle
  • Narrator Addison Anderson

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Additional Resources for you to Explore
Living with Alzheimer's in the future?
Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer's disease (AD), is one form of dementia that gradually gets worse over time. It affects memory, thinking, and behavior.
Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease here.
Is it possible to predict the possibility of Alzheimer’s disease? See more here.
Learn more about the different treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.
What are some of the drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease that are currently being researched on?
The brain is what makes us function, yet we understand so little about how it works. We are learning more about the brain by using new technology to monitor epilepsy patients during surgery. Moran Cerf explains the process doctors use to explore the brain further.
Two thirds of the population believes a myth that has been propagated for over a century: that we use only 10% of our brains. Hardly! Our neuron-dense brains have evolved to use the least amount of energy while carrying the most information possible -- a feat that requires the entire brain. Richard E. Cytowic debunks this neurological myth (and explains why we aren’t so good at multitasking).

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About TED-Ed Originals

TED-Ed Original lessons feature the words and ideas of educators brought to life by professional animators. Are you an educator or animator interested in creating a TED-Ed original? Nominate yourself here »

Meet The Creators

  • Educator Ivan Seah Yu Jun
  • Animator Chris Boyle
  • Narrator Addison Anderson

Share

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