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Mom vs. dad: What did you inherit?

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It’s easy to feel like you’re an even mix of your parents, but that’s not always the case. So, who should you be blaming over those traits you don’t like? What did you inherit from your mom and what came from your dad? AsapSCIENCE explains how ancestry works.

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Additional references


X-linked inheritance - Khan Academy

If you’re a human being (which seems like a good bet!), most of your chromosomes come in homologous pairs. The two chromosomes of a homologous pair contain the same basic information – that is, the same genes in the same order – but may carry different versions of those genes. Khan Academy explains your chromosomes.

Genetically speaking, mammals are more like their fathers - ScienceDaily

You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents -- the mutations that make us who we are and not some other person -- we actually 'use' more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads.

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