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The surprising similarities between Twister and intelligence

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It turns out that the flexibility of our brain’s connections can indicate how quickly we can learn or multitask – and is a top predictor of intelligence. BrainCraft shows how the game of Twister functions similarly to how our brain reconfigures as it learns.

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The value of mental-training games may be speculative, but there is another, easy-to-achieve, scientifically proven way to make yourself smarter. Go for a walk or a swim. Scientists have discovered that exercise appears to build a brain that resists physical shrinkage and enhance cognitive flexibility. Exercise, the latest neuroscience suggests, does more to bolster thinking than thinking does.

In addition to exercise, sleep is the mind’s best friend. Everything from your happiness to how well you age depends on your brain. When you’re sleep deprived, your cognitive functioning plummets to a less-than-ideal level, making it hard to go about your day.

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