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The brain may be able to repair itself -- with help - Jocelyne Bloch

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Through treating everything from strokes to car accident traumas, neurosurgeon Jocelyne Bloch knows the brain's inability to repair itself all too well. But she and her colleagues may have found the key to neural repair: Doublecortin-positive cells. Similar to stem cells, they are extremely adaptable and, when extracted from a brain, cultured and then re-injected in a lesioned area of the same br…

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From human brain analyses and studies in model organisms such as rodents and birds, we know neurogenesis in the adult brain persists throughout the life of the organism and is essential for maintaining both brain structure and function. This article from The Guardian provides an excellent overview of the history of Neurogenesis research.

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