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The science of Flint's water crisis

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The water crisis in Flint, Michigan is a prime example of science being ignored, unknown and even misused. The switch in water source damaged hundreds of millions of dollars of infrastructure, caused deadly bacterial outbreaks and exposed children to lead poisoning. SciShow explains the chemistry behind how so many things went wrong.

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Additional Resources for you to Explore
Lead seepage into the drinking water in Flint, Mich., has caused a massive public health crisis. The problem began when the city switched its water supply in 2014. Almost immediately, residents of Flint — a majority-black city where 40 percent of people live in poverty — started complaining about the quality of the water. City and state officials denied for months that there was a serious problem. Later studies would reveal that the contaminated water was also contributing to a doubling—and in some cases, tripling—of the incidence of elevated blood lead levels in the city’s children, imperiling the health of its youngest generation.

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Science in service to the public good - Siddhartha Roy
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About TED-Ed Best of Web

TED-Ed Best of Web are exceptional, user-created lessons that are carefully selected by volunteer teachers and TED-Ed staff.

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