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Additional Resources for you to Explore

Learn which famous hurricanes made their mark on weather history including some retired hurricane names. http://www.severe-weather-fan.com/famous-hurricanes.html

In the Atlantic Ocean, tropical storms that reach a sustained wind speed of 39 miles per hour are given a name (such as Tropical Storm Fran). If the storm reaches a sustained wind speed of 74 miles per hour it is called a hurricane (such as Hurricane Fran). So, hurricanes are not given names, tropical storms are given names. They simply retain their name if they develop into a hurricane. The names that will be used for recent and future Atlantic storms are listed in the table here:  http://geology.com/hurricanes/hurricane-names.shtml

There are distinct levels of progression as a storm becomes a hurricane. The first stage is a tropical disturbance, which is essentially a significant cluster of showers and thunderstorms. As it becomes a tropical depression, it is slightly more organized and the winds pick up to 25 to 38 mph (40 to 61 km/h). It is classified as a tropical storm when winds reach 39 to 73 mph (62 to 117 km/h). Once the winds reach 74 mph, it is classified as a hurricane and its intensity is measured by the Saffir-Simpson Scale.  http://www.livescience.com/22177-hurricanes-typhoons-cyclones.html

Find out some incredible facts about hurricanes here: http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2012/10/how-hurricanes-are-named/

Hurricane names are determined by the World Meteorological Organization in Geneva.